Fast Food Strike May 15!

shortlink here:  http://wp.me/p2w2NH-yp

mnemonic link here:  http://urlet.com/worthwhile.defects

Fast-food workers are planning a global strike for better pay and working conditions, with actions set to take place in 150 U.S. cities and 32 other countries in a bid to exert pressure on multinational companies.

Strikes are planned for May 15 across five continents in countries including Morocco, Japan, India, Belgium, Germany, Brazil, Argentina and New Zealand, where workers will stage a protest at the McDonald’s headquarters in Auckland, according to a statement by activist group Fast Food Forward. Other strikes will target Burger King, Wendy’s and KFC.

The actions were announced Wednesday in Manhattan, New York, at a meeting during which fast-food workers and union leaders detailed how they intended to expand a movement that began with a walkout in November 2012. On that occasion, some 200 workers went on strike in New York City, demanding a pay increase of $15 per hour and the right to unionize without retaliation.

 

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/5/7/fast-food-workersuniteactivistsannounceglobalprotest.html

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/breaking/chi-chicago-fast-food-worker-strike-20140508,0,804807.story

googlenews realtime http://urlet.com/put.cases

http://fastfoodforward.org/

https://twitter.com/fightfor15

#fightfor15 #luchapor15 #fastfoodglobal

http://fightfor15.org

http://15now.org

http://www.15now.org/upcoming-fast-food-strikes-in-150-cities-and-33-countries/

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Minimum Wage Hike Moves Forward In San Diego

— A proposed minimum wage hike and mandatory sick leave policy that San Diego employers would have to provide is one step closer to reaching the November election ballot.

A committee on Monday gave Council President Todd Gloria’s the go-ahead to work with City Attorney Jan Goldsmith on the ballot language and bring it back for consideration on April 30.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/Mar/24/wage-hike-minimum-gloria/

http://www.sdcitybeat.com/sandiego/article-12833-san-diego%C3%A2%E2%82%AC%E2%84%A2s-minimu.html

vid cap from last month’s kick off:

sandiego

Australia has twice the minimum wage as the US and Big Macs cost roughly the same

shortlink here:  http://wp.me/p2w2NH-o8

mnemonic here:  http://urlet.com/facade.sitting

Australia has twice the minimum wage as the US and Big Macs cost roughly the same.

via truth-out.org, Salvatore Babones, Jaisal Noor, The Real News Network

Go to link for complete transcript and VIDEO:

http://truth-out.org/video/item/18106-australia-has-16-minimum-wage-and-is-the-only-rich-country-to-dodge-the-global-recession

TRANSCRIPT:

JAISAL NOOR, TRNN PRODUCER: Welcome to The Real News Network. I’m Jaisal Noor in Baltimore.

Over the past year, increasing amounts of fast food and retail workers have been on strike demanding $15 an hour and better benefits and working conditions. Their struggle has spread nationwide, and their demands have been hotly debated in the media.

To talk about this issue, we’ll go to Australia, where the minimum wage is over $16 an hour for fast food workers.

We’re now joined by Salvatore Babones. He is a senior lecturer in sociology and social policy at the University of Sydney in Sydney, Australia, associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C., and also writes for numerous publications, such as Truthout.

Thank you so much for joining us.

SALVATORE BABONES, UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY: Oh, thanks for having me on.

NOOR: So, Salvatore, from your perspective, working in a country where the minimum wage is almost $15 an hour and for fast food workers it’s over $16 an hour, what’s your take on these demands by the fast food workers in the United States, which so far have not really been taken seriously by the media or policymakers?

BABONES: I think it’s long past the time when Americans should wake up and see, you know, how far along the rest of the world has come. If a $15 minimum wage seems unrealistic, it’s only because we’re stuck in the 1950s or 1960s idea of how you should live as a worker in America. Ordinary workers, people who do, you know, grocery store checkout or fast food, simply do much better in the rest of the developed world than they do in the United States.

As far as the Big Mac index goes, that’s a really interesting index compiled by The Economist magazine. And, in fact, Big Macs are slightly more expensive in Australia than in the U.S., something like $0.70 more expensive in Australia. What you get for that in Australia is you get to go to a fast food restaurant where you know that everybody behind the counter has full health insurance, everyone behind the counter gets a really good wage, they’re treated well, and they have, you know, options in life beyond just a grueling minimum-wage existence like in the United States. For my money, I’d rather buy a hamburger for $0.70 more, knowing that people behind the current counter have a living wage, than to pay $0.70 less for a hamburger and have slave labor conditions in fast food restaurants.

Go to link for complete transcript and VIDEO:

http://truth-out.org/video/item/18106-australia-has-16-minimum-wage-and-is-the-only-rich-country-to-dodge-the-global-recession

Australia’s Minimum Wage is $15.51 Per Hour…But Wait, There’s More!

shortlink here:  http://wp.me/p2w2NH-39

“Across the Pacific in Australia, the national statutory minimum wage is $15.51 an hour in Australian dollars. Over the past three years, the Australian dollar has been roughly equal in value to the American dollar, so the figure in American dollars is about the same. One Australian dollar roughly equals one American dollar.

Only about 2 percent of Australians, however, are covered by the minimum wage. The rest are covered by industry-wide agreements that are negotiated by the government on behalf of workers. The minimum wage in most of these agreements (including, for example, for adult fast food workers) is $17.03 an hour.

But wait, there’s more: full-time permanent employees in Australia, from toilet cleaners to chief executives, get at least ten sick days, 20 vacation days and (depending on the state) ten or more paid holidays every year. Everyone. All over Australia.

Of course, there is a catch. Part-time and temp workers don’t get these benefits. Instead, they get paid an extra 20 percent to 25 percent in cash compensation. As a result, a part-time, entry-level adult fast food worker in Australia makes a minimum of $21.25 an hour. Oh, plus health insurance. That’s universal in Australia.”

more:

Salvatore Barbones  http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/5601