Walmart Destroys the Local Economy

• Wal-Mart’s entry into a new market has a strongly negative effect on existing retailers. Supermarkets and discount variety stores are the most adversely effected sectors, suffering sales declines of 10 to 40% after Wal-Mart moves in.

• Stores near a new Wal-Mart are at increased risk of going out of business. After a single Wal-Mart opened in Chicago in September 2006, 82 of the 306 small businesses in the surrounding neighborhood had gone out of business by March 2008.

The full report is available at: http://advocate.nyc.gov/files/Walmart.pdf

 

WALMART AND THE $12 MINIMUM WAGE – FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WALMART AND THE  MINIMUM WAGE

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

link here: http://urlet.com/treat.brains or

http://eurekafairwageact.wordpress.com/2012/11/21/walmart-and-the-12-minimum-wage-frequently-asked-questions/

Q. WalMart will just pass this cost along to us, won’t they? Won’t they just raise their prices?

A. No, this is a myth. A study last year showed that even if Walmart applied a $12 an hour minimum wage to all of its hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide, and passed along 100% of the cost to its customers, that the price rise would be insignificant.

http://eurekafairwageact.wordpress.com/2012/11/18/study-how-a-12-00-an-hour-wage-standard-would-impact-walmart-workers-and-shoppers-2/

Q. If a $12.00 an hour minimum wage is so good for the economy, why don’t we just make it $50.00 an hour?

A. First of all, we are not asking for $50.00 an hour, your question is a red herring. Secondly, what we say, and what the research has proved, is that a modest rise in the minimum wage produces a modest gain in the local economy, regardless of the minimum wage in surrounding regions.

Q. Won’t Walmart just lay off a few employees to pay for this? People will lose their jobs.

A. No. Walmart prides itself on being a lean, low-cost operation. They are already running at minimum staff levels. They are already understaffing, underpaying and overworking their employees.

Q. Won’t this just drive the larger employers out of Eureka?

A. No. Eureka is the economic, political and population center of Humboldt County and the surrounding region. Thousands of workers commute into Eureka every working day. But if this unlikely effect starts to occur we will work to extend this minimum wage protection to all the workers of Humboldt County.

Q. How would this benefit local small businesses?

A. Local businesses with 25 employees or fewer will be exempt from this ordinance. On the other hand a significant portion of their customers will have a few thousand dollars more to spend locally every year.

Q. Isn’t this just more welfare?

A. No. The benefits of a higher minimum wage go to people who are workers, obviously.

Q. How do higher, fairer wages benefit the local community?

A. Higher wages paid to local workers circulate locally and grow the local economy.  It is money that is not airlifted to Bentonville, Arkansas (and sucked out of our local economy forever) or spent on a multi-million dollar CEO salary somewhere else.

Q. How much cash would flow to the local economy under this ordinance?

A. If there are 1,000 local employees covered under this ordinance, then we estimate there will be at least $2.5 million annually pumped into the local economy through higher, fairer wages, and the multiplier effect will amplify the gain.

Q. Wouldn’t $12.00 an hour be the highest minimum wage in the United States?

A. Yes, but the Eureka Fair Wage Act will only apply to large businesses with the resources to support it. Minimum wage laws in other localities apply generally to all employers large and small or only to employers with government contracts. We think our approach makes more sense both socially and economically and more closely fits our common local Humboldt ethos.

Q. Don’t minimum wage laws result in higher unemployment? Employers will fire employees to cover the cost of paying higher wages, won’t they? Isn’t that an ironclad law of economics?

A. No. Human history is clear that periods of high employment coincide with periods of high wages. This was true 500 years ago, 1,000 years ago, and 2,000 years ago, as far back as civilization began.  In the United States, workers real wages as a percentage of GDP are at a 70 year low, while real unemployment and corporate profits are at 70 year highs. The fact that there are millions of people seeking work and there are not enough jobs for them is a fault in the predatory capitalist economy that is unrelated to wages.

Contact the Eureka Fair Wage Act Campaign

Contact the Eureka Fair Wage Act Campaign

Contact: James Decker (707) 442-7465

info@fairwages.org

http://fairwages.org

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Defending the Community

http://fairwages.org

http://eurekafairwageact.wordpress.com

Get Involved, Your Skillset is Needed!

email:  info@fairwages.org

Who Can Vote In California

Qualifications to Register and Vote in California
You may register to vote if you meet the following criteria:

  • You are a United States citizen
  • You are a resident of California
  • You are at least 18 years of age (or will be by the date of the next election)
  • You are not in prison or on parole for conviction of a felony
  • You have not been judged by a court to be mentally incompetent to register and vote          
 You will need to re-register to vote when:          

  • You move
  • You change your name
  • You change your political party affiliation

Voter Registration Deadline  The voter registration deadline is always 15 days before an election.  However, please be advised that voters who register after   the 29th day before an election will not receive a sample ballot or other election information by mail.

Permissible Uses of Voter Information (Elections Code §2157.2)Information on your voter registration affidavit will be used by elections officials to send you official information on the voting process, such as the location of your polling place and the issues and candidates that will appear on the ballot. Commercial use of voter registration information is prohibited by law and is a misdemeanor. Voter information may be provided to a candidate for office, a ballot measure committee, or other person for election, scholarly, journalistic, political, or governmental purposes, as determined by the Secretary of State. Driver’s license and social security numbers, or your signature as shown on your voter registration card, cannot be released for these purposes.  If you have any questions about the use of voter information or wish to report suspected misuse of such information, please call the Secretary of State’s Voter Protection and Assistance Hotline (800) 345-VOTE begin_of_the_skype_highlighting            (800) 345-VOTE     end_of_the_skype_highlighting or (916) 657-2166 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting            (916) 657-2166     end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

Certain voters facing life-threatening situations may qualify for confidential voter status.       For more information, please contact the Secretary of State’s Safe At Home program or visit the       Secretary of State’s Web site at http://www.sos.ca.gov/safeathome. 

Remember: In California, the deadline to register to vote for an election is 15 days before each local and statewide election day.  If you register 29 days or less before an election, you will only receive a Voter Notification Card showing you are registered and telling you where to vote  — you will not receive a Sample Ballot or, for a statewide election, a State Voter Pamphlet — so register early!

Registration forms should be available at all post offices, many city clerk offices, libraries, the Department of Motor Vehicles, and County departments.  Call us and we will send you one.

You can visit or call the Election Office. Our hours are 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


Our location and mailing address is:
3033 H Street Eureka, CA 95501
You can reach us at :707.445.7678

Questions or comments?  humboldt_elections@co.humboldt.ca.us

http://co.humboldt.ca.us/election/content/content.asp?pg=VoterReg/voter_reg_info.htm

WALMART AND THE MINIMUM WAGE – FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WALMART AND THE MINIMUM WAGE

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. WalMart will just pass this cost along to us, won’t they? Won’t they just raise their prices?

A. No, this is a myth. A study last year showed that even if Walmart applied a $12 an hour minimum wage to all of its hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide, and passed along 100% of the cost to its customers, that the price rise would be insignificant.

Q. If a $12.00 an hour minimum wage is so good for the economy, why don’t we just make it $50.00 an hour?

A. First of all, we are not asking for $50.00 an hour, your question is a red herring. Secondly, what we say, and what the research has proved, is that a modest rise in the minimum wage produces a modest gain in the local economy, regardless of the minimum wage in surrounding regions.

Q. Won’t Walmart just lay off a few employees to pay for this? People will lose their jobs.

A. No. Walmart prides itself on being a lean, low-cost operation. They are already running at minimum staff levels. They are already understaffing, underpaying and overworking their employees.

Q. Won’t this just drive the larger employers out of Eureka?

A. No. Eureka is the economic, political and population center of Humboldt County and the surrounding region. Thousands of workers commute into Eureka every working day. But if this unlikely effect starts to occur we will work to extend this minimum wage protection to all the workers of Humboldt County.

Q. How would this benefit local small businesses?

A. Local businesses with 25 employees or fewer will be exempt from this ordinance. On the other hand a significant portion of their customers will have a few thousand dollars more to spend locally every year.

Q. Isn’t this just more welfare?

A. No. The benefits of a higher minimum wage go to people who are workers, obviously.

Q. How do higher, fairer wages benefit the local community?

A. Higher wages paid to local workers circulate locally and grow the local economy.  It is money that is not airlifted to Bentonville, Arkansas (and sucked out of our local economy forever) or spent on a multi-million dollar CEO salary somewhere else.

Q. How much cash would flow to the local economy under this ordinance?

A. If there are 1,000 local employees covered under this ordinance, then we estimate there will be at least $2.5 million annually pumped into the local economy through higher, fairer wages, and the multiplier effect will amplify the gain.

Q. Wouldn’t $12.00 an hour be the highest minimum wage in the United States?

A. Yes, but the Eureka Fair Wage Act will only apply to large businesses with the resources to support it. Minimum wage laws in other localities apply generally to all employers large and small or only to employers with government contracts. We think our approach makes more sense both socially and economically and more closely fits our common local Humboldt ethos.

Q. Don’t minimum wage laws result in higher unemployment? Employers will fire employees to cover the cost of paying higher wages, won’t they? Isn’t that an ironclad law of economics?

A. No. Human history is clear that periods of high employment coincide with periods of high wages. This was true 500 years ago, 1,000 years ago, and 2,000 years ago, as far back as civilization began.  In the United States, workers real wages as a percentage of GDP are at a 70 year low, while real unemployment and corporate profits are at 70 year highs. The fact that there are millions of people seeking work and there are not enough jobs for them is a fault in the predatory capitalist economy that is unrelated to wages.

Defending the Community

 http://fairwages.org

http://eurekafairwageact.wordpress.com

Get Involved, Your Skillset is Needed!

email:  info@fairwages.org